Let the Prospects Close Themselves

Why closing tricks are unnecessary.
11/1/2015
Jim Wilcox
Let the Prospects Close Themselves

Are you still using those tricky closing techniques that are supposed to transform hesitant prospects into instant customers? For example: “Let’s go ahead and get the paperwork started. Here, you can use my pen.” Or “Try it for 30 days. If you don’t like it, we’ll buy it back.”

Salespeople who use these techniques do so because they are under the mistaken belief that these tricks sometimes deliver sales. Instead of trying to use a tricky closing maneuver at the end of the sales process, try securing a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ decision before you ever make your presentation. Without a clear commitment, there is no guarantee that you will obtain a decision after making the presentation. As a result, salespeople often end up in chase mode.

Of course, a good deal of work on both sides must take place before you can expect to receive this kind of commitment at the beginning of your presentation meeting. Understand the compelling reasons to do business together, determine that the client is willing and able to spend time, energy and resources with you, and know the ins and outs of his or her decision-making process. 

This kind of clear, frank discussion about what each side expects from the presentation—and from the larger business relationship—must take place in order for your presentation to proceed. If changed circumstances make some anticipated part of the commitment unenforceable, it may still be possible for you to proceed if a new, mutually beneficial agreement can be established. On the other hand, if the change in circumstances does have a material impact, the best course of action may be to reschedule the presentation so you can make whatever changes are necessary.

This point bears repeating. If you can’t get a commitment for a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ decision, do not make the commitment to deliver your presentation. If you follow this simple rule, you’ll find that closing tricks are unnecessary.


About the Author

Jim Wilcox
Wilcox & Associates, Sandler Training
(574) 320-7360 


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